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Why You REALLY Need the 12-Step Program: A Review of The Cure by Athol Dickson

the-cure-cover-athol-dicksonFriends and family know I’m addicted to reading, but the blame for my addiction lies solely with fabulous writers like Athol Dickson. While I ought to be taking responsibility for my obsessive reading habit, I’d rather tell you about how awesome The Cure is and why you should lose a few hours’ sleep reading it.

The Cure is a novel batting at 336 pages and chock full of literary goodness. I’ll point out right away that this book is not an easy read, and I mean that in the best possible way: the writing flows but the content is deep, causing many stop-and-think-about-it moments and frequent emotional overloads. It’s definitely something that feeds the reading addiction, so I’m warning you now: BE CAREFUL BECAUSE IT’S THAT GOOD!! Now that I’ve gotten that off my chest, let’s get to the good stuff:

Riley Keep is an alcoholic who’s let his life go to pot and abandoned his wife, Hope, and only daughter, Bree, for life on the street. He is constantly haunted by his pre-alcoholic life as a Christian missionary in Brazil and stint as a college professor. He’s several states away when he hears rumors of a cure for alcoholism in the town of Dublin, Maine, his old hometown. Riley drags his nearly-dead homeless friend Brice there to seek out the cure, positive that by now his wife and child have moved on.

Riley is shocked to find that there really is a cure for alcoholism. Once he’s got it, however, Riley learns that a lot of people—from desperate alcoholics to shady pharmaceutical companies—will stop at nothing to get their hands on it. Death, mayhem, and violence ensue in an incredible story of fear and redemption.

While reading this book I sometimes loved the characters and sometimes wanted to slap them with a frying pan. Even if I didn’t agree with a character’s choices, like Riley’s, and even detested him for it, I was totally stuck in his head. I was aware of the many (and often painful) influences and horrific past events that directed his actions. I think the only thing that hung me up was the frequent references to Riley’s time in Brazil, the importance of which wasn’t revealed until near the end of the book. Overall, I give this book five stars and make them gold! Read Dickson’s work and you won’t be disappointed.

Vintage Shabby Chic meets Cross-Cultural Tension: A Review of The Dress by Sophie Nicholls

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Cover courtesy of Amazon.com

Rather than attempt to write something clever, I want to start with a short excerpt from Nicholl’s book to show you just how gorgeous her prose is: (scene is daughter, Ella, thinking about her mother Fabbia’s singing)

“Sometimes Ella would surprise Mamma singing to herself in the kitchen, the soft upper notes that seemed to shimmer in the air and the harder sounds that came from somewhere deep in her throat in a way that Ella couldn’t imitate, no matter how much she practiced in front of the mirror. Fat, blurred words and long words with drawn out sounds that mingled with the steam from the saucepans so that, when Ella swallowed Mamma’s thick stew, the one with beans and garlic, she liked to imagine she was eating the stories of her ancestors.”

Incredible. That’s all I have to say about that.

The Dress is a story batting low at 211 pages but full of lyrical goodness. The plot is simple: a mother and daughter move from England to New York to start a new life. Fabbia, the mother, loves vintage clothing and opens a shop where she can work her everyday magic in sewing and alterations. Her daughter, Ella, struggles to fit in as she deals with the new surroundings, puberty, and her mother’s fanciful personality.

I’d compare this book’s feel to that of Sandra Cisnero’s House on Mango Street, though The Dress deserves even more props. It creates a magical, melt-in-your-mouth feel that’s lightly sugared with the cultures of Tehran and New York. I love how Fabbia has an Iranian background that subtly colors her perceptions of the world around her. Fabbia’s perceptions clash with her daughter Ella’s impressions in the big city world of New York and her attempts to fit in with the other teens.

Fabbia’s and Ella’s struggles to adjust to life in America and the social mores of the affluent elite paint a brilliant picture of coming of age for both mother and daughter. They move beyond petty and sometimes even ugly human behavior directed at them by neighbors and so-called friends and learn to let others in.

Honestly, this is the first self-published novel that without reservation I give five bright, gold stars. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.